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A is for Art Bulletin...

Welcome to the first installment of a new series here on the Ingalls blog. In keeping with our commitment to providing first-class research materials, the library continues to expand its collection of electronic journals, accessible via the E-journals A-Z list on the library’s homepage. Each month I will be highlighting electronic journals that are either an integral part of our collection and therefore should not missed, or are just plain interesting or fun. We begin with the letter A.

Interact with Albers' Interaction of Color at Ingalls!

Interaction of Color, Josef Albers’ seminal color theory text was first published in 1963. Initially intended for students, Interaction of Color has been in constant use by both students and scholars during the fifty years since it was published. To continue in the groundbreaking legacy that Albers established, Yale University Press developed a digital version of the publication in 2013: an app available for the iPad.

25 Years of Parade the Circle

When the first Parade the Circle began its march around Wade Oval in 1990, it was an experiment in a different kind of parade.  According to the Plain Dealer’s David Sowd, reporting on June 8, 1990, Parade the Circle was conceived as a, “nontraditional,” parade, “that’s more performance art than anything else, with people-powered floats, giant puppets and ordinary folks walking around in homemade costumes that express favorite fantasies.” 

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